Becoming a Massage Therapist

Becoming and Being a Massage Therapist Massage Therapy is an attractive career option for many people. For starters, massage therapists report having a high level of job satisfaction and low-stress levels. Additionally, the job market is hot for massage therapists right now and massage therapy offers many career perks not found in other jobs, including flexible schedules, and good earning potential. In this article, we will cover how to become a massage therapist, and the ins-and-outs of a massage therapy career, including: How Long Does it Take to Become a Massage Therapist? How to Become a Massage Therapist Overview of Massage Therapy Career and Industry Pros and Cons of Being a Massage Therapist Is It Easy to Get a Job as a Massage Therapist? Starting Your Massage Career … Read More

How to Advance as a Professional Massage Therapist

In the last article, we discussed some of the cons of being a professional massage therapist. One of these drawbacks is inconsistent income. This is because your earnings depend on how many clients you treat per week, which can vary depending on your industry, location, and yourself (sick, etc.). … Read More

Cons of Being a Massage Therapist (and what can be done)

A career in massage therapy offers many benefits, including high-job satisfaction, a good earning potential, and the ability to make real difference in the lives of others. … Read More

What is the Required Massage Therapy Curriculum in Florida?

In the last article, we discussed how long it takes to graduate from massage therapy school in Florida. We learned that most massage therapy programs are a minimum of 500 hours long. This requirement means that most massage programs are at least 6 months long. Since most massage schools in Miami include additional courses in their curriculums, many programs end up being closer to 750 hours long, so you can expect to be in massage school for approximately 8 to 9 months. However, longer programs often have many advantages over shorter programs. For example, many longer massage therapy programs offer specialization certificates, which demonstrates competency in a specific massage modality, and gives those graduates a professional advantage. In this article, we discuss what the massage therapy curriculum is like. Hopefully, this will give you an idea of what massage classes are like. … Read More

Massage Therapy Schools in Florida: Find the Best

Do you live in Florida and have aspirations of entering the exciting and growing field of massage therapy? Or maybe you live elsewhere and envision yourself practicing massage therapy in a place with sun and an interest in holistic medicine and treatments. … Read More

How to Get Massage Therapy Certification

Even if you're great at giving your loved ones a good back rub, that doesn't make you a massage therapist. You'll need professional training and massage therapy certification before you can hang out your shingle to open for business or even work for someone else. How do you earn massage therapy certification? One of the first steps is finding a massage therapy school. … Read More

Shiatsu Massage Training Requirements

Whether you're contemplating entering a massage therapy program or wish to enhance your massage credentials, Shiatsu massage training might be of interest to you. Shiatsu is one of the many modalities of massage therapy. It incorporates traditional Chinese massage (called anma, anmo or tui na) with: … Read More

Five Great Massage Therapy Jobs

Posted May 11, 2017 by Anton Rivera, B.A. & filed under Careers, Massage Therapy, Massage Therapy Career

As the important role that massage therapy can play in health and wellness becomes increasingly known among the general public, more job options exist for those in the field. This means that aspiring massage therapists have a choice among many environments in which to work. … Read More

Massage for Wellness: Strengthen Your Immune System

Many health benefits of massage therapy are well known, including increasing range of motion, improving coordination, and reducing stress and anxiety. But many people don't know that massage for wellness also serves as an important immune system booster. People who undergo treatment can experience measurable changes in their immune and endocrine response, making massage a great promoter of wellness and immune health. … Read More

Massage Therapy Career

Posted March 22, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Massage Therapy Career

Recent data from the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) indicates greater public and medical acceptance of the value of massage and increasing consumer usage of massage therapy. • AMTA estimates that in 2009, massage therapy was a $16-20 billion industry. • Between July 2008 and July 2009, nearly 48 million individuals (22 percent) had a massage at least once. • Thirty-two percent of adults had a massage between July 2008 and July 2009 for medical or health reasons. • According to the U.S. Department of Labor employment for massage therapists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2006 to 2016, faster than average for all occupations. • Eighty-five percent of consumers agree that massage can be beneficial to health and wellness. • Nineteen percent of adults say they've used massage therapy at least one time for pain control. • Massage therapists charge an average of $63 for one hour of massage, earning an average wage of $45 an hour, including tip, for all massage related work. • Massage therapists work an average of 20 hours a week providing massage, seeing an average of 44 clients per month. • In 2009, the average annual income for a massage therapist who provides approximately 16 hours of massage per week was $37,123, compared to incomes in 2006 of $28,170 for full-time healthcare support workers; $27,190 for full-time medical assistants and $23,290 for occupational therapist aides. • Massage therapists have an average of 624 hours of initial training. Today there are more than 90,000 Nationally Certified massage therapists. • The most popular choices for continuing education for massage therapists are training for new modalities/techniques, advanced training for specific modalities and massage for specific populations, such as geriatrics and athletes. … Read More

Massage Therapy Information

Posted January 27, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Massage Therapy Career

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employment for massage therapists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2006 to 2106, faster than average for all occupations. Key points about the current massage therapy industry: • Massage therapists schedule an average of 41 massages per month and charge an average of $63 for an hour of massage. • Average annual income for a massage therapist is $31,500. • Practitioners work in several settings, including their home, spa, salon, office, health care setting, and health club. • Massage therapy is practiced as a second career for eighty-two percent of practitioners. • Currently, 42 states and the District of Columbia regulate massage therapists or provide voluntary state certification. • Since 2003, an average of 21 percent of adults has received at least one massage per year, according to annual AMTA consumer surveys. • Spas are where most people now receive massage. • Health care providers are increasingly promoting massage to their patients; more than half of massage therapists receive referrals from health care professionals. • Hospital massage therapy programs have increased by 30 percent in the past two years. Massage is commonly offered for patient pain management, stress and comfort. • Both consumers and massage therapists favor integration of massage into health care. • Over half of adults would like to see their insurance cover massage therapy. For information about Acupuncture & Massage College’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs call Joe Calareso, Admissions Director, at (305) 595-9500. … Read More

The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008

Acupuncture & Massage College would like to inform you about the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a new education benefit for service members or veterans. This education benefit provides financial support for education and housing to individuals with at least 90 days of service on or after September 11, 2001, or individuals discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days. You must have received an honorable discharge to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The amount of support that an individual may qualify for depends on where they live and what type of degree they are pursuing. Approved training includes graduate and undergraduate degrees and vocational/technical training. The maximum basic benefit is earned after serving 36 months of active duty service or after 30 days of continuous service for those individuals who were discharged for a service-connected disability. Individuals serving between 90 days and 36 months of active duty service will be eligible for a percentage of the maximum benefit. Individuals will generally receive 36 months of full-time education benefits. This should allow an individual to receive benefits for a four-year undergraduate degree; however, individuals may continue to receive benefits for approved training at an institute of higher learning, including graduate training, provided they have remaining entitlement. If eligible for more than one VA education program, individuals are limited to a maximum of 48 months of benefits. Individuals transferring to the Post-9/11 GI Bill from the Montgomery GI Bill (chapter 30) will be limited to the amount of their remaining chapter 30 entitlement. Individuals will remain eligible for benefits for 15 years from the date of their last discharge or release from active duty of at least 90 continuous days. The monthly housing allowance is based on the school location and will be sent directly to the veteran for each month of enrollment in school training at more than half time. Those individuals who are on active duty, training at half time or less or those pursuing distance learning are not eligible for the housing allowance. The maximum yearly books and supplies stipend is $1,000 and will be paid proportionally for each quarter, semester or term attended in a school year. Payment will be made to the individual during each term he or she is enrolled. While previous GI Bill benefits covered undergraduate, graduate, certificate programs, on-the-job training, flight training, and non-college degree courses, the Post-9/11 GI Bill only covers college or university programs. To request an application form to apply for benefits through the Post-9/11 Veterans Assistance Act of 2008 or to determine eligibility call Joe Calareso, Admissions Director, at (305) 595-9500. … Read More

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