Massage For Back Pain

Posted May 10, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Holistic Medicine

Many people experiencing back pain utilize massage therapy for pain management. Back pain often affects the lower back and can become a physical and psychological burden. "The cause of back pain is not always immediately clear," says Peter Sawicki, director of the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care. "But back pain usually gets better on its own within a few weeks." Back pain is only rarely caused by a more serious health problem. If low back pain does not improve on its own, massage therapy can be a treatment option. "Research suggests that classic (Swedish) massage can relieve low back pain that has lasted longer than several weeks," says Sawicki. People experiencing back pain can benefit from a combination of massage, exercises and stretching. In addition to back pain, therapeutic massage is effective for the treatment of a wide range of health conditions and their symptoms, including stress, fibromyalgia, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome, musculoskeletal disorders, arthritis, asthma/bronchitis, and carpel tunnel syndrome. Massage can reduce muscle strain, alleviate discomfort of ailments, restore balance, rejuvenate, and maintain wellness. Massage can speed the body’s healing process after surgery, illness or injuries. Therapeutic massage may incorporate techniques from Swedish, Shiatsu, deep tissue, trigger point, and medical massage. Benefits of therapeutic massage include: • Reduced muscle tension and stiffness. • Faster healing of sprained ligaments. • Reduced blood pressure. • Improved posture. • Decreased heart rate. • Balance restoration. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers massage, acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of back pain as well as for a wide range of other health conditions. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Massage For Anxiety

Posted May 04, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Holistic Medicine

Individuals receiving massage show an improvement in symptoms of anxiety in as little as 10 massage sessions, according to a new study appearing in the journal Depression and Anxiety. The improvement in symptoms is comparable to the improvement produced by psychotherapy and medications, or both. The benefits of massage may be due to a generalized relaxation response. Massage therapy is among the most popular complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments for anxiety. In addition to treating generalized anxiety disorder symptoms, health benefits of massage therapy include: • Immunity boost. • Treatment of depression. • Pain management. • Stiffness. • Blood pressure regulation. Massage therapy can treat both physical and psychological symptoms of the disorder. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage therapy for the treatment of anxiety as well as a wide range of other health conditions. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Transcendental Meditation

Posted May 03, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Holistic Medicine

Transcendental meditation (TM) can produce a unique state of restful alertness, according to a new study conducted on college students at American University. The transcendental meditation technique activates the natural default mode “ground state” of the brain, producing significant brain wave differences and a greater alpha coherence between the left and right hemispheres of the brain, suggesting the brain is working as a whole. Different meditation techniques entail various degrees of cognitive control, including the TM technique. TM can also enhance an individual’s sense of self. A consistent practice of transcendental meditation promotes longevity and may be beneficial for various diseases and ailments such as cardiovascular disease, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, headaches, arthritis, and asthma. Transcendental meditation can be used for: • Stress. • Pain. • Anxiety. • Insomnia. • Overall wellness. Health benefits of TM include: Improved concentration, circulation, increased energy, lowered blood pressure, and slower respiratory rate. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage therapy for a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Massage May Help Ease Pain

Posted March 30, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Holistic Medicine

Millions of individuals are all too familiar with pain. There can be countless trips to the doctor or chiropractor, pain medications and the difficulty of making it through the day while enduring pain. Massage therapy can relieve the pain of arthritis, muscle strain, tendonitis, and other acute and chronic pain conditions. A recent survey by the American Hospital Association shows that nearly 82 percent of hospitals that offer some form of complementary or alternative care use massage therapy, with 70 percent using massage for pain management and pain relief. More people than ever are seeking massage to manage and relieve pain. A recent AMTA consumer survey shows that nearly half, 47 percent, of those polled have had a massage specifically for pain relief. Massage therapy can: • Be more effective for chronic back pain than standard therapies. • Promote relaxation and alleviate the perception of pain. • Reduce headaches better than cold pack treatments. • Stimulate the brain to produce endorphins. • Improve confidence by encouraging individuals to effectively cope with pain. Consumers have long suspected that massage helps promote a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Consumers aren’t the only people recognizing the benefits of massage. Physicians and other health care providers are increasingly recommending massage therapy to their patients as a supplement to conventional health care. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers massage, acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine therapy for a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment at the Clinic call (305) 595-9500. For information about Acupuncture & Massage College’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Massage Therapy Career

Posted March 22, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Massage Therapy Career

Recent data from the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) indicates greater public and medical acceptance of the value of massage and increasing consumer usage of massage therapy. • AMTA estimates that in 2009, massage therapy was a $16-20 billion industry. • Between July 2008 and July 2009, nearly 48 million individuals (22 percent) had a massage at least once. • Thirty-two percent of adults had a massage between July 2008 and July 2009 for medical or health reasons. • According to the U.S. Department of Labor employment for massage therapists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2006 to 2016, faster than average for all occupations. • Eighty-five percent of consumers agree that massage can be beneficial to health and wellness. • Nineteen percent of adults say they've used massage therapy at least one time for pain control. • Massage therapists charge an average of $63 for one hour of massage, earning an average wage of $45 an hour, including tip, for all massage related work. • Massage therapists work an average of 20 hours a week providing massage, seeing an average of 44 clients per month. • In 2009, the average annual income for a massage therapist who provides approximately 16 hours of massage per week was $37,123, compared to incomes in 2006 of $28,170 for full-time healthcare support workers; $27,190 for full-time medical assistants and $23,290 for occupational therapist aides. • Massage therapists have an average of 624 hours of initial training. Today there are more than 90,000 Nationally Certified massage therapists. • The most popular choices for continuing education for massage therapists are training for new modalities/techniques, advanced training for specific modalities and massage for specific populations, such as geriatrics and athletes. … Read More

Massage Therapy Information

Posted January 27, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Massage Therapy Career

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employment for massage therapists is expected to increase 20 percent from 2006 to 2106, faster than average for all occupations. Key points about the current massage therapy industry: • Massage therapists schedule an average of 41 massages per month and charge an average of $63 for an hour of massage. • Average annual income for a massage therapist is $31,500. • Practitioners work in several settings, including their home, spa, salon, office, health care setting, and health club. • Massage therapy is practiced as a second career for eighty-two percent of practitioners. • Currently, 42 states and the District of Columbia regulate massage therapists or provide voluntary state certification. • Since 2003, an average of 21 percent of adults has received at least one massage per year, according to annual AMTA consumer surveys. • Spas are where most people now receive massage. • Health care providers are increasingly promoting massage to their patients; more than half of massage therapists receive referrals from health care professionals. • Hospital massage therapy programs have increased by 30 percent in the past two years. Massage is commonly offered for patient pain management, stress and comfort. • Both consumers and massage therapists favor integration of massage into health care. • Over half of adults would like to see their insurance cover massage therapy. For information about Acupuncture & Massage College’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs call Joe Calareso, Admissions Director, at (305) 595-9500. … Read More

Massage For Stress

Posted January 21, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Holistic Medicine

Results from the 13th annual consumer survey conducted by the American Massage Therapy Association indicate that an increasing number of Americans are seeking massage for medical and health reasons, with relaxation and stress reduction as the top reasons people get massages. A vast majority of Americans, 86 percent, agree that massage can be effective in reducing pain, and 85 percent agree that massage can be beneficial for health and wellness. “Even with the ongoing economic crisis, people are not willing to compromise their health,” says Judy Stahl, AMTA president. “It’s a clear signal of massage’s value when those making less than $35,000 a year are the second most active income bracket getting massage therapy.” Massage is effective for: • Fatigue. • Low back pain. • Knee osteoarthritis. • Boosting the body’s immune system functioning. • Lowering blood pressure. • Reducing headache frequency. For the second year in a row, the survey results show that massage therapy use is fairly steady. Thirty-two percent of stressed out Americans are getting massages to relieve their stress and 57 percent of Americans say they feel more stressed this year than last year, particularly among females (61 percent) and those ages 18-24 (66 percent). “Consumers understand that massage therapy is essential to a healthy balance between stress and relaxation,” said Stahl. “We are pleased to see that consumers are prioritizing massage to help them through these difficult times.” Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, massage and Chinese herbal medicine therapy for the treatment of a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment at the Clinic call (305) 595-9000. For information about Acupuncture & Massage College’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Disease Treatment And Prevention

Posted January 11, 2010 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Holistic Medicine

As the health care debate continues, the current edition of America’s Health Rankings has identified trends that support the need to ensure disease prevention is part of the health care reform. Based on two decades of consistent tracking, the rankings survey calls for the nation to change unhealthy behaviors that are contributing to preventable, chronic diseases. Trends cite smoking as the greatest health challenge of the past 20 years and warn obesity is likely to be the next national health concern. The health care system has become adept at treating illnesses and disease, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, Americans are struggling to modify risk factors, such as smoking, poor eating habits and lack of exercise, which contribute to chronic diseases. The United States currently spends more than any other nation on health care, including $1.5 trillion in medical costs associated with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer. These chronic, preventable conditions all have a direct link to smoking and obesity, the nation’s two largest national risk factors. Making progress against smoking and obesity is a critical step to successfully tackling the health reform our nation wants to achieve. How the nation measures up: • Nearly one in five Americans still smoke, which is only 8 million people fewer than 20 years ago. • Over the past 20 years, the nation has seen significant declines in infectious diseases. • Challenges include the rising uninsured rate. • Obesity is growing faster than any previous public health issue our nation has faced. More than one in four Americans are considered obese. As medicine shifts from treatment of diseased conditions to potential diseases, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an obvious prospect with its emphasis on prevention of diseases in health care. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers TCM therapies such as acupuncture, massage and Chinese herbal medicine. These therapies can aid in regulating and maintaining health. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about Acupuncture & Massage College’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Acupuncture For Frozen Shoulder

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AMC’s Low-Cost Community Clinic

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Massage Therapy Practice Management

Posted September 21, 2009 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy, Uncategorized, Holistic Medicine

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Make Your Massage Therapy Practice Recession-Proof

Posted August 22, 2009 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage Therapy

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