Women And Arthritis Risk

Increasing numbers of American women are becoming obese and physically inactive, leading to more women experiencing arthritis. While women in the United States have an arthritis prevalence of over 23 percent, women in Canada have a significantly lower rate of 19.6 percent, according to a new Toronto Western Research Institute study, which compared data from both countries. “Our study results suggest that the higher prevalence of arthritis in the U.S. may be a consequence of greater obesity and physical inactivity in that country, particularly in women,” says lead author Elizabeth Badley. “Public health initiatives that promote healthy weight and physical activity may benefit from including arthritis concerns in its message, and could potentially reduce the incidence of arthritis,” Badley says. The study appears in the March issue of the journal Arthritis Care & Research. Certain factors have been shown to be associated with a greater risk of arthritis. Some of these risk factors are modifiable while others are not. Modifiable risk factors include: • Overweight and obesity. Excess weight can result in knee osteoarthritis. • Infection. Microbial agents can infect joints and contribute to the development of multiple forms of arthritis. • Joint damage. Injury can result in the development of joint osteoarthritis. Acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage therapy can aid in alleviating the pain, stiffness and inflammation associated with all types of arthritis. Traditional Chinese medicine uses a multidimensional approach, treating arthritis with acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, bodywork, diet modification, and supplements as necessary depending on the type of arthritis and the symptoms. … Read More

Heart Disease in Women

Heart disease prevention remains important for women, even though awareness is on the rise. Millions of women are at risk at increasingly younger ages. Nearly 80 percent of midlife women, ages 40 to 60, still have one or more of the modifiable risk factors—high blood pressure, high cholesterol, overweight/obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes, and smoking. Sixty percent of younger women, ages 20-39, have one or more of these risk factors. There are also high rates of overweight/obesity in younger women, which can lead to higher rates of heart disease in later years. Women can prevent heart disease by: • An annual physical to check blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index. • Incorporating heart healthy eating. • Getting regular physical activity. • Maintaining a healthy weight. • Not smoking. "Women are developing heart disease at younger ages, and our research shows that many women, particularly at younger ages, still do not recognize their personal risk," says Susan Shurin, M.D., acting director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The Institute is currently reminding all women of the importance of heart disease awareness through its Heart Truth campaign. "What young women need to realize is that leading a healthy lifestyle in their 20s and 30s sets them up for a long and healthy life,” says Shurin. The late 20s and early 30s is a critical time for women to take action to reduce their heart disease risk. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage for the treatment of a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director.. … Read More

Health Benefits of Physical Exercise for Women

Among mature women, those who regularly participate in physical activity during middle age are often in better general health, according to a new Harvard School of Public Health study. Qi Sun, M.D., and colleagues assessed 13,535 study participants, at an average age of 60. Those who had increased levels of exercise were less likely to have physical or cognitive impairments, heart surgery or chronic diseases. “Since the American population is aging rapidly and nearly a quarter of Americans do not engage in any leisure-time activity, our findings appear to support federal guidelines regarding physical activity to promote health among older people,” the authors write in the report, which appears in JAMA’s Archives of Internal Medicine. Exercise has the potential to enhance overall health and well-being with aging. Older adults need at least: • 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity every week and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week. • Or an equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week. • More health benefits can be gained by increasing exercise up to or beyond 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity or 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity. Once- or twice-weekly resistance training, such as balance and tone training, can also improve attention and conflict resolution skills among older women. Resistance training can strengthen mental focus as well as improve muscular function. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage for the treatment of a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. . … Read More

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