Diet And Cardiovascular Risk

A low-carbohydrate diet in which more fat and protein sources come from plants than animals may be protective against adverse health conditions, according to a recent Annals of Internal Medicine study. In an analysis, a higher-vegetable, low-carbohydrate diet was associated with a 20 percent lower risk of death. Conversely, a low-carb diet high in meat tended to be associated with a 23 percent increased risk of death. “These results suggest that the health effects of a low-carbohydrate diet may depend on the type of protein and fat, and a diet that includes mostly vegetable sources of protein and fat is preferable to a diet with mostly animal sources of protein and fat, “ writes Teresa Fung, Sc.D. of Simmons College in Boston, and colleagues. Low-carbohydrate diets have been associated with weight loss promotion and improved blood cholesterol levels. The researchers examined data from two studies, the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals’ Follow-Up Study. A diet assessment of a total of 85,168 women and 44,548 men found that low-carbohydrate diets with more meat tended to be associated with higher all-cause mortality. This could be due to the established health benefits of unsaturated fats, dietary fiber, micronutrients, and other vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that meat-based diets may be lacking. Tips for a healthy low-carb diet: • Avoid processed meats that contain saturated fats and nitrites. • Opt for fish over red meat. • Include nuts, avocados, olives, and other plant fats in the diet. • Eat a diet of whole foods rather than convenience snacks. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage therapy for a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

American Diet Lacking Fruits And Vegetables

>Although a diet high in fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk for many chronic diseases, Americans just aren’t getting enough. Since 2000, the amount of vegetables Americans are eating has stayed the same and the amount of fruit Americans are eating has gone down. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently announced trends in fruit and vegetable consumption among adults. The CDC has spearheaded efforts with goals of getting 75 percent of Americans to eat two or more servings of fruit a day and 50 percent to eat three or more servings of vegetables a day. Unfortunately, Americans aren’t meeting these modest targets. The CDC found that only about a third of adults were eating their recommended servings of fruit, and just over a quarter of adults were eating their recommended servings of vegetables. So why aren’t Americans getting their recommended servings of fruits and vegetables? It turns out Americans might be spoiled when it comes to their produce. A national survey conducted by Fruit2day reveals that nearly half of Americans leave fruit in their fridge until it rots, with people in Boston among the worst and those in New York and Los Angeles among the best. Most Americans admit to leaving fruit in the fridge for more than a week. Other findings of the study: Americans choose strawberries as their favorite fruit. Bananas come in second. The reason behind the love of strawberries? Americans see themselves as having sweet, caring personalities like a strawberry. Tips to improve your diet: • Buy pesticide-free organic fruits and vegetables. • Reduce foods with added sugars. • Watch your sodium intake. • Avoid trans fats. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage therapy for a wide range of health conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

Mediterranean Diet Reduces Depression Risk

Individuals who follow the Mediterranean dietary pattern, rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, and fish, appear less likely to develop depression, according to a study in a recent issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. Previous research has suggested that the monounsaturated fatty acids in olive oil, used abundantly in the Mediterranean diet, may be associated with a lower risk of depressive symptoms. Almudena Sánchez-Villega., Ph.D., from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, and colleagues studied 10,094 healthy participants who completed an initial questionnaire between 1999 and 2005. Participants reported their dietary intake on a food frequency questionnaire, and the researchers calculated their adherence to the Mediterranean diet based on multiple components: Moderate intake of dairy products, low intake of meat and high intake of legumes, fruit, nuts, cereals, vegetables, and fish. After a midpoint of 4.4 years of follow-up, 480 new cases of depression were identified. Individuals who followed the Mediterranean diet most closely had a greater than 30 percent reduction in the risk of depression than whose who had the lowest Mediterranean diet scores. Components of the diet may improve blood vessel function, fight inflammation, reduce risk for heart disease, and repair oxygen-related cell damage, all of which may decrease the chances of developing depression. In addition to a healthy diet, acupuncture can aid in the treatment of depression by: • Increasing cerebral serotonin, which has anti-depressant analgesic effects. • Reducing fatigue and other symptoms of depression. • Elevating mood. • Stabilizing hormonal imbalance. Acupuncture & Massage College’s Community Clinic offers acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and massage for the treatment of a wide range of conditions as well as for overall wellness. To schedule an appointment at the Clinic call (305) 595-9500. For information about AMC’s Oriental Medicine and Massage Therapy programs ask for Joe Calareso, Admissions Director. … Read More

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