Massage Therapy Consumer Use Increasing

Posted December 14, 2006 by Acupuncture & Massage College & filed under Massage


More than 39 million Americans received a massage in the last year, according to an annual survey commissioned by the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA). More than half (53 percent) who discussed massage with their healthcare providers say their doctor recommended they get massage therapy.

“Our latest survey shows that 40 percent have had a massage to relieve pain,” says Mary Beth Braun, president of the AMTA. “While we have seen a strong interest in massage therapy for health reasons from all age groups, there’s been a real increase in understanding of the value of massage among Generation Y (18- to 24-year-olds).”

According to the survey, 92 percent say they believe massage can be an effective way to relieve pain, while 48 percent have already had a massage to relieve pain. “Younger people are telling us that massage can be a valuable part of their personal health routine,” says Braun.

Among the survey results:
• Men and respondents 65 and older are especially likely to get massages for medical/healthcare reasons
• Women indicated massage therapy was their first choice when asked “what gave you the greatest relief from pain?” (24 percent versus 19 percent for men)
• Almost one out of three (32 percent) of Hispanic respondents chose massage therapy as their preferred choice of pain relief, and more than half (57 percent) of Hispanics have had a massage to relieve pain
• The number of people who indicated having their massage paid by an insurance company or a co-pay doubled from 5 percent to 10 percent this year

“As the medical community increasingly recognizes its benefits, and as more insurance companies begin to include it in their plans, massage will become a more common component of people’s health and wellness practice,” says Braun. For information about Acupuncture & Massage College’s Massage Therapy program featuring a Japanese Shiatsu specialization, call Joe Calareso at (305) 595-9500.

"Written by Rev. Dr. Richard Browne"

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